Whole Wheat Blender Waffles with Coconut Syrup

by Erin on June 20, 2008

This morning I made a new waffle recipe. It was whole wheat and super healthy, and I’ve been looking forward to trying it out. It was AWFUL. They were so incredibly bland that I had to choke down a few bites before I decided all the rest of the waffles and batter were going in the garbage. It was that bad. After making up a batch of waffles, my heart was completely set on a warm and delicious waffle breakfast. I almost wanted to start all over and make one of my favorite waffle recipes that I could trust, but the breakfast moment was over. My hubby was on his way out the door, and my 2-year old was already filling up on his tastless poor-excuse-for-a-waffle. So I got out the old bowl and spoon, and frosted mini-wheats have never tasted so unsatisfying in my life.
Consequently, I’ve decided to post my very favorite, tried-and-true, never fail, healthy, delicious, you-won’t-be-sorry-that-you-tried-it waffle recipe. Whole Wheat Blender Waffles, pictured with delicious coconut syrup. *applause* I promise you that these are wonderful and will make your life happier! I might have to make these for lunch just to make up for the bad breakfast experience. Oh yeah – another plus to this recipe is it is SO EASY and fast. Throw it in the blender, set the timer, and viola! You have a slightly crunchy waffle that tastes delicious, sits well in your tummy, and blesses your body with whole-wheat-health! In case you don’t know what whole wheat berries are, they are grains/’kernels’ of wheat that haven’t been milled yet. I buy wheat like this and then grind it myself to make fresh whole wheat flour for bread, muffins, etc. But you don’t grind it for this recipe – you actually measure out the berries. You could probably get a small amount of berries at your local health food store.  *I have to add that you should buy WHITE wheat versus red wheat. Much better. It’s milder and sweeter than red wheat; in fact, the end products it is used in are very soft and light. (And I would recommend using HARD wheat instead of SOFT wheat.  If you have any questions about purchasing wheat, ask us (via comment or email) and we’ll help you out.)

Whole Wheat Blender Waffles
Submitted by Erin

1 c. plus 1 Tb whole wheat berries
1 c. milk
2 eggs
4 Tb oil
2 Tb sugar (or honey)
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt

Blend wheat berries and milk on high for 4-5 minutes, until batter is smooth. Add remaining ingredients and blend on low for a minute, or until incorporated. Cook on hot waffle iron. (Stir batter before pouring into waffle iron, because the heavier wheat particles will settle at the bottom.) Makes about 10 waffles.
(To make pancakes instead of waffles, use 1 c. wheat berries and 2 Tb oil.)

 

And now, time for the best part of a waffle breakfast – the homemade SYRUP! This is the best syrup ever. In the whole world. It can’t be beat. :) Seriously, when I offer to make waffles or pancakes for breakfast, the first thing my husband says is, “With Coconut Syrup?” If I say, “Well, I ran out of coconut extract…” or “I don’t have buttermilk” then he passes on the waffles. No joke. This syrup is a MUST around here. (And if you don’t like coconut, there’s a good chance you will still like this. It’s got the subtle sweet coconut flavor without the coconut texture.) Anyway, it is truly DELICIOUS.

Coconut Syrup
submitted by Erin

7-8 Tb. butter
¾ c. buttermilk
1 c. sugar
½ tsp baking soda
1 tsp coconut extract

Place butter, buttermilk and sugar in a pot. Then turn stove on medium and stir until butter melts and sugar dissolves. Bring to a boil and boil one minute. Remove from heat and add soda and flavoring. It will bubble up; just continue to stir and give it a few minutes for the ‘fizz’ to reduce before serving.

{ 18 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Melanie C. June 20, 2008 at 9:45 am

Mmmm–I am excited to try these! I make blender pancakes all the time with wheat berries–but I have never made waffles. I am sorry your waffles this morning were icky! Have a good day!!

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2 Tara June 21, 2008 at 8:16 pm

Erin, I make this ALL THE TIME!!! It’s my #1 bribe for Brianna to stay in her bed all night. I just promise her I’ll make her some of these in the morning!!! I’ll love these forever. Thank you!!!

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3 the mama monster June 25, 2008 at 10:04 am

i found your blog through mykitchencafe and just wanted to tell you what yummy recipes you have. i loved the honey lime enchiladas. i threw the chicken and maridnade into the crockpot and let it cook for a few hours, they were great! i just made your waffles last night and they were also yummy. i have a very similiar recipe for syrup but mine is with vanilla not coconut. i tried yours last night and now i’m not sure which one i like beter!

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4 Brittany June 26, 2008 at 8:52 am

Erin, you are so funny! :) I LOVE the coconut syrup too…and I can’t wait to try the waffles! They sound delicious. Perfect for me too since I have wheat but no wheat grinder yet- haha!!

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5 Heather June 26, 2008 at 12:46 pm

I discovered your site a few months ago and LOVE it! It’s getting me excited about cooking again. I made the waffles and coconut syrup last weekend and we all loved them. Your Cinnabon cake, Cowboy Cookies, Salmon Cakes, and Thai Chicken Peanut Noodles were all delicious, as well. I can’t wait to try more recipes!

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6 Mindy June 28, 2008 at 11:44 am

Mmm… I love these waffles and the coconut syrup is to die for! Griff and I love it!

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7 Rosie September 20, 2008 at 11:53 am

I just bought 45 lbs of wheat and wanted to find some recipes to use it. The waffles are great! I’m trying some of your other recipes this week! Keep cooking and posting!

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8 Kara December 31, 2008 at 9:57 am

This coconut syrup is a favorite at our house. It really is heavenly!!

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9 Jackie May 24, 2009 at 12:46 pm

Hi Erin

How much coconut syrup does this recipe make. I was thinking about making half of the recipe. Also how long is the shelf life for this syrup. Do I keep it in the shelf or do I refrigerate it.

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10 Erin May 24, 2009 at 3:50 pm

Hi Jackie,
I’ve never measured how much this makes but my guess is about 2 1/2 cups. I keep it in the fridge and heat it back up in the microwave for when I make waffles, pancakes, or crepes for breakfast. I make breakfast relatively often, so we just use the syrup until it’s gone and it’s never gone bad for me. I would say it would be fine for at least 3 weeks. You could definitely half the recipe successfully, and then that would give you an idea if you need to make the full recipe next time. I wouldn’t be surprised in that case – I’m telling you, this is delicious! :)

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11 Anonymous October 6, 2009 at 4:18 pm

hi, im just wondering if someone can tell me what 7-8 T is…is that teaspoons, tablespoons or tons?????…i want to make the coconut syrop and very illiterate when it comes to measurements…thanx….

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12 Erin October 6, 2009 at 7:18 pm

Hi Anonymous, "T" means Tablespoons. I'll change the recipe so it says Tb so it's easier to understand; but for your future reference, if you see a capital T that means Tablespoons and a lowercase t means teaspoons. I hope you like the syrup! Yum yum!

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13 Janssen February 4, 2010 at 7:28 pm

Great syrup, although I half the amount of butter and my husband and I like it better that way – more coconut flavor, less butter flavor.

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14 Lindsay January 5, 2011 at 10:30 pm

We had these over the holidays… AMAZING!!!! Thanks for sharing!

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15 Heather February 12, 2011 at 8:51 pm

These look amazing. I am having a link party this week featuring breakfast foods made from food storage. I think this recipe is a great fit. If you would like to link up that would be great.
http://cookingwithmyfoodstorage.blogspot.com/2011/02/link-party-food-storage-breakfast.html

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16 Lara October 11, 2011 at 4:39 pm

I have started learning how to sprout wheat and make sprouted flour. I’m trying to make healthy breakfasts and foods for the family, I’ve been sprouting soft white wheat. Why do you like hard wheat? Whats the difference and when would you use soft? I love your web site as well and use it often to get good recipes. Thanks.

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17 Erin October 11, 2011 at 6:22 pm

Hi Lara, I think that is great that you have been trying to use whole grains and making healthy food for your family. Hard white wheat versus Soft white wheat… Hard white wheat has a higher protein content than Soft white wheat. This makes it optimal for bread. In fact, it is very popular in the bread making industry. On the other hand, Soft white wheat is mainly used for pastries, cakes and cookies. I have used Soft white wheat before and I personally don’t like the texture as much, and in this particular recipe I have found hard white wheat to work better. But like I said, they both have their uses. So I should probably edit my note about only buying Hard white wheat because there is a time and a place for Soft white wheat even though I don’t personally use it. :)

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18 Carol December 7, 2011 at 11:58 am

I absolutely love this recipe!! Thank you so much for posting it. I love your blog!! You sisters are doing such a great thing in sharing great recipes and honoring your mom. :)

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